‘Trying to Make Everybody See’: Frank Nerkowski


There’s a guy with a guitar and way with a song, and his name is Frank Nerkowski.

Frank Nerkowski

His CD, “days gone by,” has got a country but roots-y feel and a strong persona defined by man comfortable in his own skin.

“Trying to make everybody see” is a line from the fourth track, “I’m Still Me,” and reflects the modesty of a guy who admits to struggling to fully express his vision, despite a desire to bust through society’s walls. His down-to-earth message is underscored by equally down-to-earth vocals.

Perhaps the introspection speaks to those of us inclined to reflection, yet that is hardly the scope of Frank’s repertoire. The opening “High and Low” is a foot-stomping lament in which the upbeat fiddle and drum belie the message of a man rejected by his woman. Adamant “she’ll come back to me … and see … I’m right for her and then she won’t say, ‘No,'” the singer has a passion and persistence in the face of obstacles that make it easy to relate to him.

“Since You Left Me” works in this vein as well, celebrating moonshine, Cubans and siestas — “doing anything I like” — with “everything I need in my backyard.” Tongue-in-cheek attitude accompanied by vivid imagery make for an amusing take, especially when he’s “still doing fine” even though “half the town in my vineyard [is] tasting all my wine.” Don’t we all have an ex like that, from whom we need, mostly, relief?

Nerkowski also isn’t above needing and asking for help: crooning about having a good life yet needing more in “On the Floor,” for instance.

He also calls on some melodic banjo and a chorus of singers to accompany him on the title track, “Days Gone By,” as he meditates on work, his grandfather and making a living.

Throughout this CD, Nerkowski, of Clinton, Conn., has dynamic accompaniment from Eric Lichter, wife Robin Nerkowski, MorganEve Swain, James Maple, Gordan Ingram, Tim Engle, Laura Funk, Nick Borzillo and Ed Iarusso.

Swizzle sticks and ice cubes clinking glasses punctuate the closing tune: “Drinking to Keep from Thinking (About You Babe).” This song’s country feel has just the right amount of bemusement mixed with relationship angst to keep from turning maudlin — and a rocking percussion that keeps the track tight.

Check out the full CD and take it for a spin on the open road. You won’t be sorry!

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